Osteoporosis is a silent disease, often displaying no signs or symptoms until a fracture occurs, leaving a majority of patients undiagnosed and undertreated.

Osteoporotic fractures create a significant healthcare burden, and represent a significant unmet medical need. The majority (71 percent) of osteoporosis-related fractures in the U.S. among those 50 and older occur in women.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) has estimated that nearly 8.2 million women in the U.S. over the age of 50 have osteoporosis, and nearly one in two women over the age of 50 will have a fragility fracture (or low-impact fracture that is often the result of a fall from standing height or lower) in her remaining lifetime.

The annual incidence of osteoporotic fractures is higher than that of stroke, heart attack and breast cancer combined; osteoporotic fractures also account for more hospitalizations and associated costs than cardiovascular disease and breast cancer.